Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Earth Day East of the Hudson

So the tulip blossoms fall to their death by St. Aloysius
glowing for a moment
                                     before bright mid-April sunshine
makes the slightest hints of green a portal to heaven,
the purple on the floor like Easter mourners
                                                               outside the void
of the hollow, blackened-out cathedral.

And spring won't even laugh,
its endless flowing like some rope in children's hands,
turning all that we remembered
                                                      leaf by leaf
            to something new,
                                           the emptiness of music.

So much that we do, as humans, is indigestable:
our thoughts of predators
                                           are in our water,
our wasted nervous energy
                                              blows through our air,
but somehow, we cannot believe
the earth that always comforts us
                                     cannot release what's stuck.

The fish are coming back
                                           to Antarctica,
the whales are going home because they do not need
                                to feel our pain any more.
New alphabets are forming,
                as always with our hearts to pick out words
from an apple tree that keeps on growing.

4 comments:

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the walking man said...

It is rather hard to believe that mountain top removal coal mining somehow will harm the earth.

Maybe we could go fishing for Blue marlin at McMurdo Station. I hear they have their own ATM in Antarctica now.

Hannah Stephenson said...

All the animals are leaving us, eh? This one is touching.

Jack said...

From the endless rope to a tree that keeps on growing...fantastic through-line.

That "rope" line is exceptionally creative, by the way.

Opening with the word "so" gives a different tone of authority, like everything is obvious beyond an omniscient narrator. Like, "everyone knows about this."